my own little world

This is practically the only peaceful part of my life left, other than my art.

my own little world
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"Remember: Magic spells take many forms, from spoken word to candle burning, to mixing oils, to something as simple as posting an image on the wall. Your energy, focus and intent are what transform simple actions, words and gestures into magic spells."
Judika Illes, Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells (via dryadwitch)
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stunningpicture:

It’s all a matter of perspective
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Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.

Necklaces by RubyRobinBoutique.
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houseofmind:

Neural Basis of Prejudice and Stereotyping
As social beings, humans have the capacity to make quick evaluations that allow for discernment of in-groups (us) and out-groups (them). However, these fast computations also set the stage for social categorizations, including prejudice and stereotyping.
According to David Amodio, author of the review I am summarizing: 

Social prejudices are scaffolded by basic-level neurocognitive structures, but their expression is guided by personal goals and normative expectations, played out in dyadic and intergroup settings; this is truly the human brain in vivo.

But what is the role of the brain in prejudice and stereotypes? First, let’s start by defining and distinguishing between the two: 
Prejudice refers to preconceptions — often negative — about groups or individuals based on their social, racial or ethnic affiliations whereas stereotypes are generalized characteristics ascribed to a social group, such as personal traits or circumstantial attributes. However, these two are rarely solo operators and are often work in combination to influence social behavior. 
Research on the neural basis of prejudice has placed emphasis on brain areas implicated in emotion and motivation. These include the amygdala, insula, striatum and regions of the prefrontal cortex (see top figure). Speficifically, the amygdala is involved in the rapid processing of social category cues, including racial groups, in terms of potential threat or reward. The striatum mediates approach-related instrumental responses while the insula, an area implicated in disgust, supports visceral and subjective emotional responses towards social ingroups or outgroups. Affect-driven judgements of social outgroup members rely on the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and may be characterized by reduced activity in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region involved in empathy and mentalizing. Together, these structures are thought to form a core network that underlies the experience and expression of prejudice. 
In contrast to prejudice, which reflects an evaluative or emotional component of social bias, stereotypes represent the cognitive component. As such, stereotyping is a little more complex because it involves the encoding and storage of stereotype concepts, the selection and activation of these concepts into working memory and their application in judgements and behaviors. When it comes to social judgments, I find it useful to think of prejudice as a low road, and stereotypes as a high road (which recruits higher order cortical areas). For example, stereotyping involves cortical structures supporting more general forms of semantic memory, object memory, retrieval and conceptual activation, such as the temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), as well as regions that are involved in impression formation, like the mPFC (see bottom figure). 
Importantly, although prejudice and stereotyping share an overlapping neural circuitry, they are considered as different and dissociable networks. Also, it is important to remember that areas such as the mPFC, include many subdivisions that may contribute to different aspects of the network. This is important because these within structure subdivisions are usually not readily identifiable in neuroimaging studies. Anyway, if you want to learn more about the specifics of these network and obtain real world examples of these networks at work, read the full review article (see below). 
Source:
Amodio, D.  (2014). The neuroscience of prejudice and stereotyping. Nature Reviews Neurocience. doi: 10.1038/nrn3800
houseofmind:

Neural Basis of Prejudice and Stereotyping
As social beings, humans have the capacity to make quick evaluations that allow for discernment of in-groups (us) and out-groups (them). However, these fast computations also set the stage for social categorizations, including prejudice and stereotyping.
According to David Amodio, author of the review I am summarizing: 

Social prejudices are scaffolded by basic-level neurocognitive structures, but their expression is guided by personal goals and normative expectations, played out in dyadic and intergroup settings; this is truly the human brain in vivo.

But what is the role of the brain in prejudice and stereotypes? First, let’s start by defining and distinguishing between the two: 
Prejudice refers to preconceptions — often negative — about groups or individuals based on their social, racial or ethnic affiliations whereas stereotypes are generalized characteristics ascribed to a social group, such as personal traits or circumstantial attributes. However, these two are rarely solo operators and are often work in combination to influence social behavior. 
Research on the neural basis of prejudice has placed emphasis on brain areas implicated in emotion and motivation. These include the amygdala, insula, striatum and regions of the prefrontal cortex (see top figure). Speficifically, the amygdala is involved in the rapid processing of social category cues, including racial groups, in terms of potential threat or reward. The striatum mediates approach-related instrumental responses while the insula, an area implicated in disgust, supports visceral and subjective emotional responses towards social ingroups or outgroups. Affect-driven judgements of social outgroup members rely on the orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and may be characterized by reduced activity in the ventral medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), a region involved in empathy and mentalizing. Together, these structures are thought to form a core network that underlies the experience and expression of prejudice. 
In contrast to prejudice, which reflects an evaluative or emotional component of social bias, stereotypes represent the cognitive component. As such, stereotyping is a little more complex because it involves the encoding and storage of stereotype concepts, the selection and activation of these concepts into working memory and their application in judgements and behaviors. When it comes to social judgments, I find it useful to think of prejudice as a low road, and stereotypes as a high road (which recruits higher order cortical areas). For example, stereotyping involves cortical structures supporting more general forms of semantic memory, object memory, retrieval and conceptual activation, such as the temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), as well as regions that are involved in impression formation, like the mPFC (see bottom figure). 
Importantly, although prejudice and stereotyping share an overlapping neural circuitry, they are considered as different and dissociable networks. Also, it is important to remember that areas such as the mPFC, include many subdivisions that may contribute to different aspects of the network. This is important because these within structure subdivisions are usually not readily identifiable in neuroimaging studies. Anyway, if you want to learn more about the specifics of these network and obtain real world examples of these networks at work, read the full review article (see below). 
Source:
Amodio, D.  (2014). The neuroscience of prejudice and stereotyping. Nature Reviews Neurocience. doi: 10.1038/nrn3800
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enochiancameos:

deerthing:

asgardreid:

izzylobo:

cosmo-nautic:

This GIF shows an example of conductive ink. 
Circuit Scribe is a rollerball pen that uses a silver conductive ink to let you create fully functioning circuits as fast as you can can draw, making it cheaper, faster, and easier to test out electronics and prototype concepts.

Coool…

1. Draw sigils
2. Summon cyber demons,
3. ???
4. PROPHET.

OH my GLOBBB this is cool!!!

mind-heart, b-m-taylor look!
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0rient-express:

Stairway to the Castle | by Karol Nienartowicz.
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Aitch
Things that fit in a heart

Via
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uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
uispeccoll:

The Floral Keepsake for 1850 features 46 plates of colored engravings.  Each flower is its own chapter and features flower lore, practical planting knowledge, and botanical description.  The keepsake also includes several poems and an index of the flowers and their associated meaning. The editor, John Keese, was both an amateur poet and bookseller.  I can only imagine that his love for the content and the object would have inspired him to work on this project.
-Jillian P.
AY11 .F53 1851
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wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
wapiti3:

Varieties of plants. A selection of the most common plants our hallways in words and pictures. ; By Schmeil, O. (Otto), 1860-1943 Fitschen, JOST, 1869-1947 on Flickr.
Publication info Leipzig, Quelle and Meyer, 1913. BHL Collections: New York Botanical Garden
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staceythinx:

Plant sculptures by Émeric Chantier
staceythinx:

Plant sculptures by Émeric Chantier
staceythinx:

Plant sculptures by Émeric Chantier
staceythinx:

Plant sculptures by Émeric Chantier
staceythinx:

Plant sculptures by Émeric Chantier
staceythinx:

Plant sculptures by Émeric Chantier
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harrystylesdildo:

my anaconda don’t


sorrowful-sonata
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maximumbuttitude:

geekscoutcookies:

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

tidiness:

after reblogging this i opened up a card my great aunt gave me it has money in it

It could be a complete coincidence but I reblogged this yesterday and toda I fouund $40 at the fruit maket

Eh,why not

I shit out thousands of dollars in pennies right now I am shitting out pennies this is happening why please help me